Helping Teachers Make a Difference in the Lives of Their Students

Classroom Management – Donald Trump Style

I was honored to have Michael Graffin (@mgraffin) from A Relief Teacher’s Journey ask me to guest post on his blog. Michael has been one of SITC’s greatest sources of encouragement and support. Michael even opened his wallet and donated money toward the fundraiser that I put on at my school to fight childhood leukemia. That was cool. His blog posts are an excellent place for new teachers and  more seasoned teachers like me to find great tips on how to find success in the classroom. That’s why I  subscribe to his RSS feed. Michael has already agreed to guest post on SITC, so stay tuned. In the meantime…

Here is the post that I sent to Michael. It’s called Classroom Management – Donald Trump Style

 

When I tell people that I teach middle school, I always get the wow-you-deserve-a-medal look or the sorry-you’re-stuck-with-that-job look or the and-you-haven’t-gone-crazy-yet look.

When I tell them that I’ve been teaching 12 and 13-year-olds for over 20 years now, and I’m still loving it, they can’t believe it.

Why is that? Why did my college dean tell the other teacher prospects that I was going straight to heaven when I died, because I wanted to teach middle school?

It’s because we all know 12 and 13-year-olds. We know how they behave. We know how they think they know more than anyone. We know how they want to push the limits. We know how they don’t like rules.

Of course, not all 12 and 13-year-olds act like this, but we know enough who do, and having 35-40 of them in a room together for close to an hour at a time can be scary.

That’s why you will find very few teachers who actually want to be middle school teachers. Most of them want to be elementary or high school teachers, which I totally understand.

When I first started teaching, I looked too young to be a high school teacher, and I didn’t have the patience for elementary kids. They require you to smile too much, and you have to dance and sing and decorate your room in a bright pastel colors, and that’s just not me.

When I got a long term substitute position in middle school, however, I knew I had found my place.

To teach middle school, you have to be an expert in classroom management or else you’ll be eaten alive by these hormone-driven, drama-seeking, argumentative, push-your-buttons, trying-to-find-out-who-they-are students.

So in this post, I wanted to share some of what I’ve learned over the years about classroom management, and hopefully I’ll be able to help newer teachers find a little more success in the classroom.

I truly enjoy what I do, and middle school kids are amazing. I know, however, if I didn’t have my classroom management skills, I probably wouldn’t be teaching anymore, and I probably wouldn’t still have all my hair.

Here we go:

1. Make Great Lesson Plans

The best way to keep students from misbehaving is to keep them engaged. This will only happen when you have a great lesson. The times when I’ve had the most problems with my classroom management were those days when I just winged it. For some reason, I came to class with no plan. It’s a rarity, but it served to remind me of the dangers of not being prepared. With 8th graders, five minutes of nothing to do will turn into 10 minutes of redirection. Lesson plan preparation is the most important element in great classroom management. I always plan for more than the time allows. If I have a 40 minute period, I plan for 50 minutes. I also always have a mini lesson, like a vocabulary activity, in my back pocket just in case I have too much period left after the lesson.

2. Remember That They’re Just Kids

I often hear teachers talk about how a certain student made them so mad that they wanted to kick that student out of the classroom, call their parents, place them on the terrorist watch list, etc. You have to remember that these are kids. They are going to do things that we adults know better not to do. Once we remind ourselves that these are just kids, then we won’t get so upset. We won’t get into a shouting match with a 12-year-old. Do we excuse the behavior? No, of course not. We hand out a consequence and make that a teachable moment. Some kids just don’t know why what they did was wrong.

3. Show Them You Care About Them

For a lot of teachers, this is an easy one. You probably wouldn’t get into teaching if you didn’t have a heart for kids. There are times, however, when we lose focus on this, especially when the students are acting out or when we have other more personal issues occupying our thoughts or when  the administration is pressuring us to improve test scores, etc. Many times the student who is acting out the most is doing so out of a need for attention that he/she is not receiving elsewhere. It would be a good idea to take a look at the student’s records to see if there are any home issues that would help explain his/her behavior. This takes time. You’ll have to spend that valuable prep period or time before or after school to do the research, but if you can conceptualize a day when that one student is not causing problems in your class, it may be worth the investment of time. I’ve had many students who are terrors in every other class except mine, not because I’m a better teacher, but  because I’ve made a connection with this students, and he/she doesn’t want to break that connection by making me mad. Taking time to show some sincere concern to this student will make so much of a difference in how he/she behaves in your class. What I like to do is bombard that student with positive comments. “You’re so smart.” “That was amazing.” “Nice job.” A lot of times, these students have only heard negative words coming from the adults in their lives. They’ll behave better in your class, because they know they’ll get some verbal pats on the back for a change.

4. Act Like Donald Trump

On thing I’ve noticed about Mr. Trump is that he is in charge everywhere he goes. Even when  he’s not the person in charge, he acts like he’s the person in charge. It’s all about his presence. That is what I notice about teachers who have problems with classroom management. They don’t have the in-charge presence. It’s almost like they’re afraid of the kids. The kids will ask them a question like, “Why do we have to do this?“, and they’ll go into a long and confusing explanation describing the reasons why the lesson that they are about to begin is important or they’ll get offended and kick the student out of the class.

Would Donald do that?

When a student asks me that question, I stop and give him/her my I-can’t-believe-you’re-questioning-my-lesson look. Most of the time, the student will say, “never mind,” and I’ll continue as if the question was never raised. It’s all about presence. It’s your class. You are the expert. You know everything, and the students are so fortunate to be spending 40 minutes of their lives learning from you. This is a change in mindset for many new teachers who are unsure about their abilities and are still learning how to teach. The sooner they get past this and move into the I’m-in-charge phase, the sooner they’ll see a decrease in their discipline problems. It’s not being mean or tyrannical. It’s being in charge. It’s all about presence. Go ahead and fake it if you have to, but don’t let the students get any idea that you are not the one in charge. By the way, Mr. Trump, if you’re reading this, how about hooking up my students with some new laptops? It’s worth a try.

These are just a few ways to help you with classroom management, and although I’m definitely not the world’s expert in this area, I have been teaching 8th graders for the last 20+ years, so that gives me a little bit of an edge.

I love what I do. I have a great day almost every day, because my students don’t ( or can’t ) ruin my day. I can see how many teachers leave the profession just after three years. It is an often thankless job with very little pay and little support, and on top of all that, you have a bunch of kids who want to see how far to the edge they can push you.

There are many, many benefits that come with being a teacher, however. You don’t make a lot of money, but you do make a difference. Getting your classroom management skills perfected will help you not only make more of a difference, but you’ll have fun in the process.

I share some more specific tips on my other website: TipsForNewTeachers.com, so feel free to take a look.

I would welcome any comments, questions, criticisms, etc.

Thanks,

Sam

 

Image by: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pokoroto/

(It’s the closest image I could find that gave that Donald Trump feel without infringing on copyright. )

2 Comments

  1. May 18, 2011    

    Hmm, I’ve enjoyed reading the Twitter and posted comments about this post on A Relief Teacher’s Journey, and I’ve spent most of the day thinking about the “Trump” theme, and contemplating my own response.

    I write & think about classroom management from the perspective of a primary/elementary relief/substitute teacher, and I know next-to-nothing about Mr Donald Trump (aside from the fact that he’s rich, and has political aspirations). In my role, I tend to see students’ worse behaviours, and have only had a small taste of what it’s like to manage a class “all of my own”.

    In responding to some of the issues raised, I’m inclined to side with Sam, although I’d argue for some give and take. When teaching older children (no, I haven’t taught early secondary), I’m happy to admit I don’t know everything (I’m a learner too), but I’ve also found it essential to deflect/rebuff students’ challenges to or attempts to undermine my authority.

    I’m currently working as a relief teacher in a Year 6 class, and I’ve been working to eliminate the “begging”, “whining” and “moaning” that they seem to think ‘guarantees’ they will get their own way.

    I’ve used a combination of deflective humour, explicit ‘laying down ground rules’, and following through with stated consequences. I’ve had to point out (humorously) that “the world doesn’t revolve around you. It revolves around me. Get used to it!”

    Nevertheless, if there’s one lesson I’ve learnt the hard way – it’s this: If you are firm, fair and consistent in establishing and maintaining your classroom authority – your students will respect you for it. As the teacher, YOU are the authority figure. You’re in charge.

    I’m not saying “be a dictator” – I believe effective teachers model respect, active listening, and life-long learning. Nevertheless, their body language and demeanour, their ‘persona’, tells students who’s in charge – and they’re respected for it.

    • Sam's Gravatar Sam
      May 18, 2011    

      Great comment Michael. Being “firm, fair and consistent” is essential to good classroom management. The kids will be quick to point out when you’re not. Body language also plays a key role. It’s incredible how kids can read fear and insecurity in a teacher. Thanks.

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