Helping Teachers Make a Difference in the Lives of Their Students

Believing in All Your Students

Hello again,

It’s been a really long time since I’ve added a post on the SITC blog.

Sorry about that.

As some of you know, I’ve published my last episode of the Amazing Teacher Podcast.

It was a great year of inspiring interviews with amazing teachers and educators from around the country, and I am so glad that I was able to share their expertise and advice with so many of you.

I just felt that it was time to bring the podcast to an end.

The episodes are still available on Itunes as well as on the website – TheAmazingTeacher.com if you would like to take a listen. I know you will be inspired as was I.

I am so excited about getting back to posting on a regular basis her on SITC.

I have made a goal for this coming 2015 year to add at least 100 posts before the year is out.

After listening to Hal Elrod’s podcast, I’ve been inspired to set some goals for my life. If you haven’t heard Hal Elrod’s story, you have to make some time to do so. I know you will be inspired.

In this post, I want to remind new and soon-to-be teachers out there to never give up on kids – especially that student who just doesn’t care about school.

I know it’s so easy to focus on those students who are paying attention and sitting at the edge of their seats as you deliver the lesson.

Those are your “good” students. Right?Amazing teacher believe in all their students.

Many teachers are quick to label those student who are disruptive and apathetic as the “bad” students.

I would encourage you to see all your students as “good” kids. They all have potential. They all are  capable of great things. They need someone who will remind them of that. They need you to remind them of that.

I remember a teacher telling me, “That kid will end up in jail someday.”

I told her, “Not if I can help it.”

It isn’t easy, but if we can look beyond the disruption and disrespect, we will see a kid who needs someone to believe in him/her.

We just recently enrolled a student who grew up in a very poor environment. At 13, her life story is already one of abuse and violence. After only three days, she had had an in-your-face confrontation with two teachers. I admit, I was one of the ones who vocalized that perhaps my school was not the right placement for her.

With the support of an amazing Foster mother and the attention of collection of caring teachers and administrators, I am happy (and embarrassed) to say that she is doing great.

All it takes sometimes is for one teacher to demonstrate that a student is important and has value for a positive change to take place.

The most amazing teachers I know believe in all their students.

Be that teacher who believes that all your students have value. Be that teacher who can see a bright future in all your students.

You’ll be amazed at how they will rise to your expectations.

I’ll be adding another post soon, so please check back often or follow me on Twitter at @samrangelsitc

Again, one of my goals is to add 100 posts before this time next year. Please feel free to tweet me if you notice that I’m slacking off. I’ve learned from Hal that having someone to help keep us accountable is essential – especially for procrastinators like me.

Hal doesn’t know that I’m talking about him – yet.

If you read this, Hal, I just want to say thank you for getting me started up again.

Check out Hal’s new book:

 

Until next time,

Here’s to your Success in the Classroom!

 

Thanks,

 

Sam

 

 

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